Tarbell Trail – Yacolt Burn State Forest

View of Mt. St. Helens from the trail

Do you love wildflowers and volcano views? Yeah, so do I 😁

I’m always telling you all about the under-rated Tarbell Trail in the Yacolt Burn State Forest (write-up in “little feet hiking“). This time of year, the area is full of native wildflowers, migratory birds, animal tracks, and volcano views (on clear days of course). I’ve been hiking this trail for 10 years and it has been so neat to see the clearcut forest grow back and the diversity of the plants growing along the trail. Today, I saw anemone flower blooming and tiger lily not far behind.

The best time to visit if you want to see wildflowers is late May through June. Keep an eye out for wild irises and lupine in the more open areas, and beargrass when hiking through the shadier forest section.

Wild iris and lupine blooming on the trail in June

Remember to bring your WA Discover Pass, sun protection and extra water on this hike. On sunny days, there isn’t much cover from the sun. Also, avoid drinking the non-potable water at the trailhead (the water is for horses) and watch out for mountain bikes zooming down the trail.

Awesome rock along the trail

Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge is finally open!

The new entrance to the refuge.

Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge is open after a 2 year closure! I love the new trail…the first mile takes you along the dike, so you get an amazing vantage point looking down. After the first mile, you can get deeper into the refuge and now hike over 4 miles! Today we saw a white pelican, a bittern, herons roosting, an osprey with babies, purple martens, a red tail hawk, an egret, and more. So excited to visit regularly and update my hike descriptions.

View of Larch Mountain (Oregon) from the Mountain View Trail

Parking was challenging on opening day, so try visiting on a weekday in the coming weeks. There is a lot of excitement about the new trails, which all have new names. Also, remember that the trails aren’t complete yet, so it will look like a bit of a construction zone in some places. Check out the new trail map and head on over!

Big thanks to Columbia Gorge Refuge Stewards, Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other partners for making this happen! Check out this great write-up here.

Family Guided Hiking Series through TreeSong

Author Jessica Becker is leading several guided hikes for families this spring.

SATURDAY, MAY 21
10:30 AM – 2:30 OR 3:30 PM

SUNDAY, JUNE 26
10:30AM – 2:30 OR 3:30PM

Registration for each hike closes at 10:00am the day before. Be sure and reserve your spot! Register here: https://www.treesongnatureawareness.org/family-hikes-2022

LOCATION AND DETAILS:
MAY 21: Yacolt Burn State Forest, WA. Hike will be 3.5 miles with 400 feet gain. WA Discover Pass required. 

JUNE 26: Near Cougar, WA. Hike will be 2 to 4 miles. WA Discover Pass required.

INSTRUCTOR:
JESSICA BECKER

Join local kid’s hiking guide author Jessica Becker on some lesser known SW Washington trails. On these hikes, your family will engage in place-based learning on native plants, animal tracking, birds, geology, history, maps and wayfinding, trail safety, sensory awareness, and more.

These hikes are geared toward families with kids ages 5 and up. Younger kids are welcome, but please bring back-up carriers for kids who cannot maintain a 1.5mph pace for the duration of the hike. We will take distanced snack and lunch breaks.

What to bring: You will be required to bring everything your family needs to be self-sufficient on the hike, including food, water, rain gear, warm layers, sit pads, parking passes, etc. It is recommended that kids carry some of their necessary gear.

A packing list, hike location, and weather forecast will be sent to you 2 weeks prior to the event.

There is an additional offsite waiver required which will be given out on the hike day. No dogs please.

Hikes are limited to 20 walking participants (children in backpacks do not count toward this limit).

Jessica is CPR/First Aid certified.

TUITION: $5 (PLUS PROCESSING FEES) PER WALKING PARTICIPANT (CHILDREN IN BACKPACKS DO NOT COUNT TOWARD TUITION COSTS).

BIPOC SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE.

Bells Mountain Trail from Cold Creek Day Use Area

When it’s raining/snowing/hailing, one of my favorite hikes is along the Bells Mountain Trail starting from Cold Creek Day Use Area (located in the Yacolt Burn State Forest in Southwest Washington). The western red cedar and Douglas fir trees protect you from falling precipitation and the creek is so lovely. There are several beach spots along the creek and a lot of native plants budding and blooming. You can learn more about this 3.6 mile hike and it’s western red cedar trails in my first book “little feet hiking.”

Waterfall near the trailhead
Short user trail down to the creek
So many types of trees: western hemlocks, Douglas firs, western red cedars, and big-leafed maples
Skunk cabbage (yellow flowers) and false hellebore (looks a bit like corn stalks)
Weathered trillium flower
Bridge near trailhead
Western red cedar trees
Amazing nurse stump

5 Fantastic Winter Hikes Near Portland

Originally posted on PDXParent.com on February 7th, 2022

We all spend a lot of time indoors during our wet Pacific Northwest winters. However, with the right gear and knowledge, you can make winter one of your favorite hiking seasons. Trails are less crowded, migratory birds are in the area, and waterfalls are full. That said, weather can be unpredictable, trails can be muddier, and there may be road hazards.

For winter hiking with kids, it can be good to stay lower in elevation, closer to cell service, and away from fire-damaged areas. It’s also a great idea to:

Latourell Falls Loop

Image courtesy Jessica Becker

Walk right up to two waterfalls on this 2.4 mile loop hike. This hike is a Gorge treasure and is appropriate for kids who can navigate steep trails that are slippery when wet and are narrow with drop-offs. This hike also has great Gorge views as well as fun trees to climb on and walk through. Be prepared for the cold sensations of waterfall spray as you make your way around the loop.


Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge — Oaks to Wetlands Trail

Image courtesy Jessica Becker

Winter is the best time to visit the refuge because of all the migratory birds! You don’t have to walk very far on this easy 2 miles out-and-back trail to see and hear the noisy and beautiful swans that flew south for the winter. Along the trail, you may even come across deer, birds of prey, ducks, and more. Bring a pair of binoculars and stop to read any interpretive signs. A section of the trail is closed on Thursdays and there is a fee to park. Consider a drive on the nearby Auto Tour Route to see even closer-up views of winter waterfowl and birds of prey. 


Oxbow Regional Park – Ancient Forest Loop 

Image courtesy Jessica Becker

Winter means fewer visitors at popular Oxbow Regional Park, which means animals are more likely to be out and about. The gentle 1.5 mile Ancient Forest Loop is a great place to track animals year round, but winter is an especially good time to practice your fox walking and owl eyes skills. Use caution near the swift river and save time for some playground play. 


Old Salmon River Trail

Image courtesy Jessica Becker

If you’ve ever wanted to hike through a fairy forest, the Old Salmon River Trail in Welches is the place to visit. You can hike up to 3.8 miles out-and-back along the river through a mossy old-growth forest. There are multiple parking areas and every section of this trail is beautiful. Plan on playing by the riverbank and climbing on and hugging massive trees. Keep an eye on kids around drop-offs and the swift river. 


Cooper Mountain Nature Park

Cooper Mountain Loop, courtesy Sarah Hummel via AllTrails

This Metro-run park is a fantastic place to hike in winter. You can combine small loops to hike up to 3.2 miles of oak savannah and ponderosa pines. The trail has some elevation gain, depending on the loops you choose. Keep an eye out for deer, birds of prey, and views of Mt. Hood. There are interpretive signs along the trail, as well as ‘listening trumpets’, which are designed to amplify the sounds of nature. No dogs are allowed and there is an awesome nature playground at the trailhead.